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it's just dave

Nashville's Eastside Density gets boost

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This is extremely good news for the Eastside. The property on which this will be built is very visible with magnificent views of downtown. Although gentrification has created a "trendy" atmosphere in parts of East Nashville, this one appears to be for the "non-rich." It's about time the eastern fringe of downtown worked on creating the former density of the past. With the continuing demolition of old housing projects and the intense redevelopment of those sites, something like this comes along to add positive, large-scale development to an area of town whose time has come. The build out is long, but will be worth the wait. The emphasis on underground parking and extreme pedestrian orientation will bring continued diversity to the neighborhood and provide a huge boost to transit development in this area of town. This comes on the heels of the East Nashville oval-shaped town square being proposed for the area of Main and Gallatin Road. I'll try to post a rendering of this. It's a while away, but momentum is growing fast.

On to this. If there are renderings, I'll post later.

Home Company unveils $70M Fifth & Main

By William Williams, [email protected]

January 21, 2005

Nashville's single-most significant New Urbanism development - both in terms of size and price tag - is slated for a key parcel of East Nashville property, as The Home Company is preparing to begin an approximately $70 million mixed-use project to be called Fifth & Main, located where the two streets intersect.

Steve Neighbors, Home Company president, said the non-profit developer purchased the roughly seven-acre site this week for approximately $2.2 million. The site was once home to a Genesco shoe manufacturing operation.

The Home Company, the real estate development affiliate of Affordable Housing Resources, Inc., envisions 324 residential units (60 percent for-purchase and 40 percent rental) and about 70,000 square feet of commercial space (to contain retail and office). The bulk of the parking will be underground, giving the development a strong pedestrian feel.

Neighbors said ground-breaking on the ambitious project is slated for the summer, with the build-out to require a minimum of five years.

The development will rest within MDHA's East Bank Redevelopment District and, as such, will need the agency to approve its design. MDHA has tax increment financing monies for the district, and Neighbors said The Home Company plans to pursue those funds. He declined to note how much, however.

Neighbors stressed the importance of having the area's diverse neighborhood groups support the project. He has had discussions with District 6 Metro Councilman Mike Jameson, and various public meetings will follow. A public hearing before Metro Council will take place in May as the property will require a rezoning to mixed-use general.

"We look forward to making the neighbors aware of our proposal, and we will vigorously solicit their input and guidance," he said.

Neighbors said the buildings will be no taller than five stories, and that there will be a variety of building heights, configurations and contemporary architectural styles. Residences will range from lofts to town homes to stacked town homes.

Fifth & Main will be adjacent to Parkway Terrace and near Sam Levy, both public housing developments overseen by MDHA. Neighbors said he is comfortable potential residents will embrace the diversity of the area, and he wants to ensure that the residents of the two public housing developments are included.

"We see this as an enhancement to the quality of life of the current residents," he said. "We want to make sure they are a part of the planning process.

Gresham Smith & Partners created the original master plan, with Everton Oglesby Architects handling the design.

Gary Everton, EOA partner, said Fifth & Main will be geared overwhelmingly to pedestrians.

"Everything will relate to the people who work there, live there and shop there," he said. "It's a mixture of housing types and socio-economic strata."

Everton said other cities have used the Fifth & Main model, but added, "I will say it's a little unusual in that we're driving the cars underground."

Everton said the "gateway" location and proximity to downtown will ensure the project's success.

Phil Ryan, MDHA executive director, also stressed the "gateway" nature of the planned project.

"Based on initial discussions, it's going to be a very big project at a very critical spot," Ryan said.

Ryan said the East Bank Redevelopment District has about $24.5 million in TIF monies but declined to discuss the possibilities of the project receiving assistance.

Jeff Ockerman, an attorney with Stites & Harbison PLLC, represented seller Fifth Third in the transaction.

"I think it is a unique, challenging and visionary project," said Ockerman, a former chair of the Nashville Civic Design Center and president of the East Area Business Council.

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Affordable ihousing is a key to a successful city. We can't price the middle class out of our cities. Props to the developer.

The underground parking is a nice touch, too.

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A quick addendum: The site is within three blocks of a large chunk of land, approximately 5 acres between Woodland and Main (former BOA property), that was recently purchased by CODA Development Co. This is the same company that has built several large residential projects in the West End, including the West End Lofts I & II and the upcoming (and expensive) Midtown Lofts on 31st. Plans haven't been presented yet.

Another company, Bristol Development, is reconfiguring their plans for a large plot two blocks from the CODA site. This will be more residential with some commercial.

My only hope is that the architectural/historical nature of the area is respected and no one builds anything suburban in nature in this area. They have enough parking lots.

One more thing. The Metro Zoning Board last night approved the variance requested last night by the Germantown Partners for the construction of 8 new 3-story townhomes in the historic German town neighborhood. This will be built on a critical corner lot with buildings meeting the street and all parking in garages accessed through the alley.

Also in Germantown, the 3-block long Morgan Park development has been enhanced and will be larger than originally planned. This will be urban townhomes, row houses, one single family detached residence, and commercial space. This hasn't broken ground yet, but the new sign renderings look really good.

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Thanks, Dave. Golly, I've got to get up there. Still can't talk the wife into moving to TN yet. She's a tough nut, having been born/bred here. I keep telling her "No Income Tax!"... Oh, well... I appreciate the updates.

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Thanks, Dave. Golly, I've got to get up there. Still can't talk the wife into moving to TN yet. She's a tough nut, having been born/bred here. I keep telling her "No Income Tax!"... Oh, well... I appreciate the updates.

Come on We will love to have you. As far as income tax, I don't know how long it will be before we get one.....But with Nashville u see it growing right before your eyes....

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My only hope is that the architectural/historical nature of the area is respected and no one builds anything suburban in nature in this area. They have enough parking lots.

Dave, that's the key. Ensure housing is built upon sidewalks then the street, lots of small business/pedestrian oriented retail in general, and of course more and more urban housing. :)

Regarding the income tax, I have always hoped that TN would finally get one. We need to half the sales tax, cut user fees, lower property taxes, and implement a progressive income tax. That's what would HELP Tennessee.

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Heckles, every state in the u.s thats has a lottery pay income tax. Tennessee is next if we like it our not...

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Tennessee will not get an income tax for a while. I know Dave Goetz's son is in my grade and we are friends.

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I miss TN's lack of income tax...

I owed A LOT of state income tax here this year in Alabama due to interest income...

*grumbles*

Maybe I should become a Republican...

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I miss TN's lack of income tax...

I owed A LOT of state income tax here this year in Alabama due to interest income...

*grumbles*

Maybe I should become a Republican...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Nah...you should just live in TN :thumbsup:

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Or TN should annex North Alabama... Birmingham and Huntsville are hated by the state of Alabama anyway, so why not? ;)

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Why are they hated? I think they're the only places in Alabama I'd actually live.

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The reason?

Both are "different" from South Alabama, which controls the state government. Birmingham and Huntsville are more progressive(Birmingham's political climate is a lot like Nashville's -- liberal inner-city, conservative burbs), educated, and wealthy than the rest of the state and it angers quite a few in Montgomery.

Sadly, it is glaringly apparent that the state despises both Birmingham and Huntsville, unless talk of our money comes up, then we're loved. The feud between the state and the city of Birmingham goes back DECADES...

For example, way back in the 50s, the federal government wanted to place the then new Southern superhub in Birmingham since it was the geographical center of the South. Air travel was getting ready to explode, and naturally, Birmingham was more than thrilled to receive such an honor. There was just one catch -- at the time, Alabama had the highest jet fuel tax in the nation. Both the federal government and the city asked repeatedly for the state to lower the tax, but to spite Birmingham, the state RAISED the tax even higher. The government then decided it would be best to persue other options and Atlanta was chosen as the new site for the airport... and, well, you've seen the results... :whistling:

Another example is that NO interstate highways were completed in Birmingham UNTIL the 70s -- they all stopped about 10 miles outside of the city. This was Alabama's way of punishing the city for not going along with what the leaders at the time thought should have been the status quo. Obviously, if you look at growth patterns, it staggered growth of the entire metro in the 1970s and even on into the 80s...

To this day, we get ignored on civic projects and our roads and infrastructure are still crumbling. Yet, ironically, the state decided that it was more important that every highway in Montgomery should be widened to a mininum of 8 (!) lanes in their city limits. Even though our metro population is over a million people, our largest is only 6.

The largest injustice is what we pay in taxes -- for every dollar Birmingham/Jefferson County sends to the state, we get 33 cents back.

Considering all the crap we've been through, it's a miracle we've come this far.

So, TN, will you adopt us? :wub:

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Wow, my amazement with Alabama's backwardness has just been enlarged. Didn't they realize it would be good for the entire state to have the superhub in Birmingham? Why do they hate these cities? Does Alabama just not like the few cities in the state that aren't backward? My simpathy goes out to you in those cities. I've always thought Birmingham and Huntsville were different from the rest of the state.

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The reason?

Both are "different" from South Alabama, which controls the state government.  Birmingham and Huntsville are more progressive(Birmingham's political climate is a lot like Nashville's -- liberal inner-city, conservative burbs), educated, and wealthy  than the rest of the state and it angers quite a few in Montgomery.

Sadly, it is glaringly apparent that the state despises both Birmingham and Huntsville, unless talk of our money comes up, then we're loved. The feud between the state and the city of Birmingham goes back DECADES...

For example, way back in the 50s, the federal government wanted to place the then new Southern superhub in Birmingham since it was the geographical center of the South.  Air travel was getting ready to explode, and naturally, Birmingham was more than thrilled to receive such an honor.  There was just one catch -- at the time, Alabama had the highest jet fuel tax in the nation. Both the federal government and the city asked repeatedly for the state to lower the tax, but to spite Birmingham, the state RAISED the tax even higher. The government then decided it would be best to persue other options and Atlanta was chosen as the new site for the airport... and, well, you've seen the results...  :whistling:

Another example is that NO interstate highways were completed in Birmingham UNTIL the 70s -- they all stopped about 10 miles outside of the city. This was Alabama's way of punishing the city for not going along with what the leaders at the time thought should have been the status quo. Obviously, if you look at growth patterns, it staggered growth of the entire metro in the 1970s and even on into the 80s...

To this day, we get ignored on civic projects and our roads and infrastructure are still crumbling. Yet, ironically, the state decided that it was more important that every highway in Montgomery should be widened to a mininum of 8 (!) lanes in their city limits. Even though our metro population is over a million people, our largest is only 6.

The largest injustice is what we pay in taxes -- for every dollar Birmingham/Jefferson County sends to the state, we get 33 cents back.

Considering all the crap we've been through, it's a miracle we've come this far.

So, TN, will you adopt us?  :wub:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

do you think it's because birmingham and huntsville have "lectristy" ? :rofl:

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Ha. Claws, I appreciate the sympathy. We know how poorly we're treated here in the state and we do the best we can. I love Birmingham like you love Nashville... I just view it as another challenge we have to face to be successful.

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Don't let me get too much back on topic or anything, but the Planning Commission just approved on final reading a development called Martin's Corner which will bring multiple millions of dollars in mixed use residential, commercial, grocery, etc to an area just south of Five Points and in dire need of update. The first phase of urban residential will begin in April of this year with more planned for the fall. Concurrent and upcoming commericial development will complement the housing.

This announcement falls on the heels of the recent announcement that the Bristol Development on Woodland St. has finally gotten off the ground with approvals and design phases being completed. Construction should begin in early summer.

A commercial development on the Woodland South side of Five Points begins construction soon, as well. This will provide addition street side retail to the current vacant land. This should complement the spreading commericial district of Five Points along with the rehabbing and reuse of the large building adjoining the Woodland Sound Studios.

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Back on topic? Boooooooooooring.

;)

Thank goodness more retail is coming to Five Points. It desperately needs something like this and it should also provide a big boost to the surrounding area.

edit: Oww my English...

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I wonder what the truth is about Delta's airline hub in Birmingham.

I've heard the same story relative to Memphis and to New Orleans, though moreso with Birmingham.

I suspect it's a southern urban legend.

In any case, the federal govt. doesn't put a hub anywhere. An airline does.

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It wasn't the hub itself, but the airport. Ask any elderly Birmingham resident -- they all know about the entire situation. I've also done some further research at the Lin-Henley and have found the entire thing chronicled in the archives of the Birmingham News. I should go dig 'em up again and post my findings.

Anyways, back to East Nashville density ^_^

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Great project! Nashville is really getting it together. I may have to move back up there.

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The reason?

Both are "different" from South Alabama, which controls the state government.  Birmingham and Huntsville are more progressive(Birmingham's political climate is a lot like Nashville's -- liberal inner-city, conservative burbs), educated, and wealthy  than the rest of the state and it angers quite a few in Montgomery.

Sadly, it is glaringly apparent that the state despises both Birmingham and Huntsville, unless talk of our money comes up, then we're loved. The feud between the state and the city of Birmingham goes back DECADES...

Another example is that NO interstate highways were completed in Birmingham UNTIL the 70s -- they all stopped about 10 miles outside of the city. This was Alabama's way of punishing the city for not going along with what the leaders at the time thought should have been the status quo. Obviously, if you look at growth patterns, it staggered growth of the entire metro in the 1970s and even on into the 80s...

To this day, we get ignored on civic projects and our roads and infrastructure are still crumbling. Yet, ironically, the state decided that it was more important that every highway in Montgomery should be widened to a mininum of 8 (!) lanes in their city limits. Even though our metro population is over a million people, our largest is only 6.

The largest injustice is what we pay in taxes -- for every dollar Birmingham/Jefferson County sends to the state, we get 33 cents back.

Apologies for hijacking the thread, but Birmingham's real problem, unlike Nashville, is a lack of leadership. The current mayor has no vision or leadership ability to speak of. The metro legislative delegation, the largest in the state, is characterized by infighting that reduces their effectiveness and grandstanding tactics that alienate the rest of the state.

Birmingham is getting the largest highway projects in the state, I-22 and the Northern Beltline. Montgomery's highway spending is due to it being the state capital.

North Alabama legislative districts comprise a majority of the legislature, so any complaints about funding priorities should be laid at the feet of those legislators. The governor is from north Alabama as well.

Back in the pre-civil rights days, when the legislature was malapportioned, power was concentrated in the old Black Belt. That hasn't been the case for forty years, though.

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I agree; our government sucks. Our mayor is horrible as well. One of the things I am hoping to accomplish with my Save City Federal campaign is getting my name out there, so in the future when I enter politics in Birmingham, I'll already be known.

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