Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

urban addict 20324

Three Gorges Dam

14 posts in this topic

:w00t: Located near Yichang, in Hubei province, down river from the magnificent Three Gorges section on the Yangtze river, this great dam rises up and challenges the Yangtze. This is a very massive project for China to undertake and it lasts 16 years from 1993 to 2009. Sun Yat Sen, as far back as 1919, proposed a dam to be built, but the idea was dormant up to a few years before 1989, when the project was given the green light. This project costs $25 billion US dollars and involves building a dam around 2,000m long and 181m high with a ship elevator and locks. It will be used for flood control, power generation of 18.2 gigawatts, and improved navigation by allowing ships to go as far as Chongqing by the reservoir created. The Yangtze was dammed in 2003 and the first of the 26 power generators came online. A web of powerlines transfers this power to metro areas far, far away. The waters have started to rise and it will do so until 2009, when the reservoir reaches its planned level. This large man-made lake would moderate temperatures locally and cause more precipitation to fall, but it's also the source of a lot of controversy. The reservoir would permanently destroy many of the historical artifacts and landscapes as far as Chongqing upriver. A massive effort has been made to save some of these irreplaceable objects, but still it's not enough. Also, due to the reservoir, 1.13 million people have to be moved to avoid being submerged and that means demolishing a lot of the existing villages, towns, parts or the entire city, and the infrastructure. Mass demolitions are underway, tearing up everything and some people balk at having to move. The third matter is the river carries a lot of silt and there's fear of it piling up behind the dam, decreasing the resevoir's capacity to store water and requiring dredges to puck it up. Lastly, there's fear of this lake turning into a giant cesspool due to the river being moderately polluted when it reaches the dam, but there's a plan to reduce this pollution. Anyway, this is an engineering marvel for years to come. :) I'll snet pics later. -_-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I remember seeing a show on Discovery about the Three Gorges. It looks mighty impressive. I'd love to see some pics, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:) Some pics: gorge_med.jpgthree_gorges_dam_july13_2003_dg.jpgthree_gorges_dam_july13_2003_dg-thumb.jpg Some pics of the reservoir from space (not yet completed).

ch98.jpg Model of the dam.

dam-michel_gunther-3_gorges_300px.gifThree%20Gorges%20Dam.jpgthreegorges2_dam_1.jpg_39109416_aerial_afp200.jpg Construction pics.

Wan_Zhou_04.jpg Mass demolition underway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had also heard about this in abook that I have read recently. it was a very interesting non-fiction story about a tourist traveling in the area and interviewing the community about the dam. It was quite interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If reading a book is pleasing to you, then how do you think it would be if you actually went there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey do you know how large the Three Gorges is in relation to the Hoover Dam built on the Colorado? Do you think its a similar project in its potential to increase the productivity of people in the surrounding regions?

Thanks

:w00t: Located near Yichang, in Hubei province, down river from the magnificent Three Gorges section on the Yangtze river, this great dam rises up and challenges the Yangtze. This is a very massive project for China to undertake and it lasts 16 years from 1993 to 2009. Sun Yat Sen, as far back as 1919, proposed a dam to be built, but the idea was dormant up to a few years before 1989, when the project was given the green light. This project costs $25 billion US dollars and involves building a dam around 2,000m long and 181m high with a ship elevator and locks. It will be used for flood control, power generation of 18.2 gigawatts, and improved navigation by allowing ships to go as far as Chongqing by the reservoir created. The Yangtze was dammed in 2003 and the first of the 26 power generators came online. A web of powerlines transfers this power to metro areas far, far away. The waters have started to rise and it will do so until 2009, when the reservoir reaches its planned level. This large man-made lake would moderate temperatures locally and cause more precipitation to fall, but it's also the source of a lot of controversy. The reservoir would permanently destroy many of the historical artifacts and landscapes as far as Chongqing upriver. A massive effort has been made to save some of these irreplaceable objects, but still it's not enough. Also, due to the reservoir, 1.13 million people have to be moved to avoid being submerged and that means demolishing a lot of the existing villages, towns, parts or the entire city, and the infrastructure. Mass demolitions are underway, tearing up everything and some people balk at having to move. The third matter is the river carries a lot of silt and there's fear of it piling up behind the dam, decreasing the resevoir's capacity to store water and requiring dredges to puck it up. Lastly, there's fear of this lake turning into a giant cesspool due to the river being moderately polluted when it reaches the dam, but there's a plan to reduce this pollution. Anyway, this is an engineering marvel for years to come. :) I'll snet pics later. -_-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also saw the Discovery Special. At the time, they were building a "ship elevetor" on one side of the dam... pretty much a single lock that rose up 600 feet or something. Did they end up finishing that? If so, that has to be one impressive machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


China very much reminds me of the United States in the 1900's, 1910's and 1920's, an emerging world super power that will soon acquire its throne. Interesting to watch history repeat itself, in the 1920's for the first time EVER the U.S. had more people living in the cities and 'burbs then on farms and hamlets. There is power in taking millions (or in China's case a billion) of people and industrializing them into one national focus. Very very interesting times over there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some stats for your information: :)

LARGEST HYDRO-ELECTRIC DAMS

Three Gorges Dam, China - 18,200 megawatts

Itaipu, Brazil/Paraguay - 12,600 megawatts

Guri, Venezuela - 10,000 megawatts

Grand Coulee, US - 6,494 megawatts

Sayano-Shushensk, Russia - 6,400 megawatts

Krasnoyarsk, Russia - 6,000 megawatts

Churchill Falls, Canada - 5,428 megawatts

La Grande, Canada - 5,328 megawatts

Source: International Hydropower Association, UK

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/5000092.stm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its located like right on top of a fault line that was discovered during construction. If that gets pulled apart by a earthquake, millions of people will die without warning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
its located like right on top of a fault line that was discovered during construction. If that gets pulled apart by a earthquake, millions of people will die without warning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, but does L.A. have one specific structure that if it fails, mass destruction will ensue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No it doesn't and that is even more of an issue for them. A single point can be engineered to withstand an earthquake and given the consequences I've no doubt the dam has been designed to withstand any expected earthquake and then some. On the other hand in LA, there are millions of places where this kind of consideration did not or could not happen. One only need note the failures that occured there during the Northridge event that happened there a few years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.