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JaxInvestor

The St Johns Flow...

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This has been cited in a few of the editorials...does anyone else realize how untrue and inconsequential this is?

A river flows from high point to low point, simply put. North, south, east, west---whichever direction it runs in is inconsequential. A river doesn't know that we humans THINK that the North is HIGHER than the South. Just because we look at a flat map on the wall and say the top is north, we think that all rivers should run from the top of our nice map to the bottom.

Just wanted to rant a bit.

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The St. Johns River flows, north, along with several other rivers, the Niagara River for example, also flows North.

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the New River in NC is another...the Nile...many rivers actually flow north...it is inconsequential the direction a river flows. it has to do simply with flowing from high ground to low ground.

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Just for the heck of it, here's some maps fo the st. johns. It does look pretty cool. I have to admit that the St. Johns Basin through Brevard county is one of my most favorite places in the world.

stjohns_wlstations.jpg

Springs

map03.jpg

St. Johns WMD and watershed

map_dist.gif

The mouth

Mouth.jpg

Jacksonville and the River

sjnautical_waterlevels.gif

1920

62500.gif

1918

Greater.jpg

1864

M054701.jpg

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That is really neat! I never knew that it went down to the Vero Beach area by the middle of the state.

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I think the reason it seems so odd is that very few rivers in the U.S. flow South to North. Of course the reason for this is that Canada is to the North and our oceans/guls are to the East, West and South. The Great Lakes and the Great Salt Lake are an exception.

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I think another thing that makes it seem so odd is that it parellels the coast for so long, instead of just emptying to into it. In most places of the world, the land gradually lowers as it gets closer to water. Here there's a ridge, however small, that goes up the coast.

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When the average American thinks "river" or "river city" it is the Mississippi or its Ohio and Missouri cousins (though not due south they tack more and more southernly). The Colorado River, Hudson, Susquehanna all southernly. Americans are used to thinking that. The Potomac even has a southern tack to it. In Canada and Russia though almost every river flows NORTH.

Pittsburgh has a Northernly flowing river in downtown. The Monongahela flowing north from West Virginia joins the Allegheny to form the Ohio in downtown Pittsburgh.

Chicago and Cleveland (though minor rivers) also have northernly flowing rivers in downtown.

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there are some sweet nautical maps you can buy of it. we got one from our boat from the julington creek marina and it has absolutely everything on it. theyre made by kingfisher:quality lake maps. so any other boaters check them out because they have a lot of other locations.

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nice maps, and yes the river flows, like the mighty mississippi it flows, it also flows some nasty water, this is the sediment river>>> who knows what the hell is down there>>> don't get me wrong>>> native jacksonvillian and proud of our river: BUT, what the hell is in that water?????

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Yeah, the river looks okay from a distance, but when you look at it closely, it starts looking like the Thames, lol.

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It is probably just because Jacksonville is so close to the mouth that the sediment builds up here. Probably, if you go down south, the river is not as murky. Its just a thought.

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When I was a kid (1980s) I went to a summer camp at the Bolles School in Jacksonville. They had us swim in the river sometimes - talk about needing a shower! It was pretty gross and the dock ladders even had barnacles on them, so clearly there is quite a bit of brackish water flowing quite a ways upstream.

We did have a manatee encounter one day, pretty exciting stuff when you're 9!

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When I was a kid (1980s) I went to a summer camp at the Bolles School in Jacksonville.  They had us swim in the river sometimes - talk about needing a shower!  It was pretty gross and the dock ladders even had barnacles on them, so clearly there is quite a bit of brackish water flowing quite a ways upstream. 

We did have a manatee encounter one day, pretty exciting stuff when you're 9!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

yo, zed. i am a Bolles alum and remember a number of times that they found more than manatees in the river by the dock>>> try more like body parts.. i think that the river is sometimes a dumping ground for more than factory waste>>> crime waste??? so there isn't a chance in fell you'll find the cuban swimming in the river??? well, at least not alone!!!!

still a major asset to the city skyline.

CC

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Well, one of our fiberglass manatees got dumped in the river, near Wonderwood, I think. Some stupid vandals did it. So would that be considered "a manatee in the river" ot "crime waste in the river". :blink:

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I know there's a huge difference in scale, but they're currently dredging and cleaning up the Miami River. Has there been any talk of cleaning the St. Johns?

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I think that they have started cleaning it up by the surface. Eventually, they will probably try to dredge parts and clean it a little more thoroughly.

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