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satalac

lrt in nashville

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i think nashville should put a lrt line that goes along 440. then have some connectors that run to south nashville and brentwood and also bellvue and green hills. this would cut some of the traffic down and help the pollution a bit.

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Is Nashville currently planning lrt?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i haven't heard of any plans for it, but i believe it could work. lrt would be more attractive than the rail lines they have plans for. plus you could make more stops along the way, so it would be easier to use. the only downside would be building the infastructure for it since there are no existing rail lines to use as with what is proposed. we need something like marta, which is pretty successful in atlanta, especially to hartsfield intl.

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i think nashville should put a lrt line that goes along 440. then have some connectors that run to south nashville and brentwood and also bellvue and green hills. this would cut some of the traffic down and help the pollution a bit.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Why run LRT to Brentwood? Very few citizens of Brentwood actually commute into downtown Nashville (or Nashville at all) and those that do and those that come into the city for other reasons would be the elast likely to give up their cars to make the trip.

Areas that could really benefit from either a line now or a line for future development would be atreas like...Hillsboro Village, Madison, Nolensville Rd, West End, Airport, Germantown/5-points, Music Row, Bordeaux, Jefferson St - Fisk - TTU, and possibly Green Hills and Opryland/Music Valley. It is better to let more suburban areas like Bellevue and Brentwood depend on commuter rail and cars/bus transport.

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I feel a little differently after having pie-in-the-sky hopes for rail in Nashville. This city isn't ready for rail in many ways: politically (too many politicians against rail because its government doing something), socially (too many people don't understand transit, wouldn't know how to use it), and financially (when was the last time Nashville's government had a surplus??). The city is cash-strapped for current programs, we can get federal funding but we need to use it wisely.

In order to get full service transit services, I think we should start with busways and the upgrade from there. We could use new electric buses on certain routes as well as LRT-like modern bus cars on other more busy routes.

I made out two maps that I think should be considered for BRT/busway corridors. What this would entail is repaving and redesigning the roadways to where they had bus-only lanes were possible, and in other areas just general improvements (landscaping, sidewalks, grants for businesses to convert signage and improve outdoor walkability/visual ailments, below ground power lines and metal stoplights). Each one of these corridors badly needs it, and we all know it who lives in Nashville. The city needs an overall revitalization, and getting a federal grant to do this much work would be completely dooable.

Also for BRT routes, it would be frequent 10 minute frequency per bus, or 5 minutes on very busy urban routes like West End/21st. And there would be a need for a 24 hour bus network that had reduced service after midnight (maybe only the major lines down Gallatin, Murfreesboro, and West End) with only 30 minute service.

In addition, you see I've drawn some circular lines not going into downtown. This is equally important, creating a system with ways to get around the city from different lines without connecting downtown. The current system has no usable way to do this.

Here is my preliminary map for what could be done.

North Nashville:

northnash.gif

As you can see, no one in East Nashville - one of the city's more dense districts, and pro-transit districts - would be more then a .5 mile walk from a BRT line.

South Nashville:

southnash.gif

Repaving, widening, and landscaping the Woodmont and Harding corridors with a BRT line would revolutionize south Nashville and give people ways to connect. Major, MAJOR work needs to be done on Lebanon Pike east of downtown. Its overly industrial with a poor mix. It makes the center city look shabby. This could be a major housing development area where thousands of units could be built within a year or two after completion. Other corridors need the physical upgrades (they all do).

Anyway, as you can see this would be a start to revolutionize the central city into a more livable community. Poverty reduction needs to be an issue we work on for areas like the JC Napier homes. They need to be completely demolished so Murfreesboro Pike can be revitalized, along with this idea.

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I feel a little differently after having pie-in-the-sky hopes for rail in Nashville. This city isn't ready for rail in many ways: politically (too many politicians against rail because its government doing something), socially (too many people don't understand transit, wouldn't know how to use it), and financially (when was the last time Nashville's government had a surplus??). The city is cash-strapped for current programs, we can get federal funding but we need to use it wisely.

In order to get full service transit services, I think we should start with busways and the upgrade from there. We could use new electric buses on certain routes as well as LRT-like modern bus cars on other more busy routes.

I made out two maps that I think should be considered for BRT/busway corridors. What this would entail is repaving and redesigning the roadways to where they had bus-only lanes were possible, and in other areas just general improvements (landscaping, sidewalks, grants for businesses to convert signage and improve outdoor walkability/visual ailments, below ground power lines and metal stoplights). Each one of these corridors badly needs it, and we all know it who lives in Nashville. The city needs an overall revitalization, and getting a federal grant to do this much work would be completely dooable.

Also for BRT routes, it would be frequent 10 minute frequency per bus, or 5 minutes on very busy urban routes like West End/21st. And there would be a need for a 24 hour bus network that had reduced service after midnight (maybe only the major lines down Gallatin, Murfreesboro, and West End) with only 30 minute service.

In addition, you see I've drawn some circular lines not going into downtown. This is equally important, creating a system with ways to get around the city from different lines without connecting downtown. The current system has no usable way to do this.

Here is my preliminary map for what could be done.

North Nashville:

northnash.gif

As you can see, no one in East Nashville - one of the city's more dense districts, and pro-transit districts - would be more then a .5 mile walk from a BRT line.

South Nashville:

southnash.gif

Repaving, widening, and landscaping the Woodmont and Harding corridors with a BRT line would revolutionize south Nashville and give people ways to connect. Major, MAJOR work needs to be done on Lebanon Pike east of downtown. Its overly industrial with a poor mix. It makes the center city look shabby. This could be a major housing development area where thousands of units could be built within a year or two after completion. Other corridors need the physical upgrades (they all do).

Anyway, as you can see this would be a start to revolutionize the central city into a more livable community. Poverty reduction needs to be an issue we work on for areas like the JC Napier homes. They need to be completely demolished so Murfreesboro Pike can be revitalized, along with this idea.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Right...the areas I was talking about for LRT could be served well by BRT for the time being. I still believe there is no reason that mass transit options other than commuter rail should be extended to the edges of Davidson County or beyond. Hendersonville and Mt. Juliet are already served by commuter vans from MTA.

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Why run LRT to Brentwood?  Very few citizens of Brentwood actually commute into downtown Nashville (or Nashville at all) and those that do and those that come into the city for other reasons would be the elast likely to give up their cars to make the trip. 

Areas that could really benefit from either a line now or a line for future development would be atreas like...Hillsboro Village, Madison, Nolensville Rd, West End, Airport, Germantown/5-points, Music Row, Bordeaux, Jefferson St - Fisk - TTU, and possibly Green Hills and Opryland/Music Valley.  It is better to let more suburban areas like Bellevue and Brentwood depend on commuter rail  and cars/bus transport.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

the reason i said brentwood is because a lot of people travel from south nashville to brentwood to go to work (my self being one of them). the edmonson pike area is exploding with growth. if there was a lrt line going to downtown and brentwood, traffic could be greatly reduced. it takes me 10 minutes to get to brentwood when there is nobody on the road. in the morning it takes me around 30-45 minutes and coming back around 5:00 it takes even longer. it will get worse too because of all of the townhouses and subdivisions getting built. i remember when nippers corner (the intersection of edmonson and old hickory) used to just be nipper's nursery :( btw, the rest of the lines that you mentioned would be awesome. heckles is right about why we can't build one right now though. it's a shame too, it would help so much.

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I feel a little differently after having pie-in-the-sky hopes for rail in Nashville. This city isn't ready for rail in many ways: politically (too many politicians against rail because its government doing something), socially (too many people don't understand transit, wouldn't know how to use it), and financially (when was the last time Nashville's government had a surplus??). The city is cash-strapped for current programs, we can get federal funding but we need to use it wisely.

In order to get full service transit services, I think we should start with busways and the upgrade from there. We could use new electric buses on certain routes as well as LRT-like modern bus cars on other more busy routes.

I made out two maps that I think should be considered for BRT/busway corridors. What this would entail is repaving and redesigning the roadways to where they had bus-only lanes were possible, and in other areas just general improvements (landscaping, sidewalks, grants for businesses to convert signage and improve outdoor walkability/visual ailments, below ground power lines and metal stoplights). Each one of these corridors badly needs it, and we all know it who lives in Nashville. The city needs an overall revitalization, and getting a federal grant to do this much work would be completely dooable.

Also for BRT routes, it would be frequent 10 minute frequency per bus, or 5 minutes on very busy urban routes like West End/21st. And there would be a need for a 24 hour bus network that had reduced service after midnight (maybe only the major lines down Gallatin, Murfreesboro, and West End) with only 30 minute service.

In addition, you see I've drawn some circular lines not going into downtown. This is equally important, creating a system with ways to get around the city from different lines without connecting downtown. The current system has no usable way to do this.

Here is my preliminary map for what could be done.

North Nashville:

northnash.gif

As you can see, no one in East Nashville - one of the city's more dense districts, and pro-transit districts - would be more then a .5 mile walk from a BRT line.

South Nashville:

southnash.gif

Repaving, widening, and landscaping the Woodmont and Harding corridors with a BRT line would revolutionize south Nashville and give people ways to connect. Major, MAJOR work needs to be done on Lebanon Pike east of downtown. Its overly industrial with a poor mix. It makes the center city look shabby. This could be a major housing development area where thousands of units could be built within a year or two after completion. Other corridors need the physical upgrades (they all do).

Anyway, as you can see this would be a start to revolutionize the central city into a more livable community. Poverty reduction needs to be an issue we work on for areas like the JC Napier homes. They need to be completely demolished so Murfreesboro Pike can be revitalized, along with this idea.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What are you? Some type of urban planning professional??? :) You have some awsome ideas!!! Especially with the idea of improving esthetics with underground utilities with metal post stop lights. Most planners within Nashville don't have the forward thinking insite to think of such. Memphis is actually hurting because of lack of planning over the years. Development is too spuratic and way too sprawled to make things run the way they want. IMO, Nashville will outgrow its mindset and become a model for urban planning.

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Currently, Memphis' suburbs are far better then Nashville's. These are my dreams, they most likely won't become reality - and if they do it'll probably be decades.

And I'm not going to be here for very long anyhow, this area is not accepting to people with my ideology. Its why my type tend to leave places like Nashville.

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Bus line will not work because its to far out and it would take a long time to get to downtown...Come on now, I do not wish to take a bus from Downtown to Murfreesboro,,,,I am with satalac a light rail thats is made just like Marta will be best for nashville......

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Bus line will not work because its to far out and it would take a long time to get to downtown...Come on now, I do not wish to take a bus from Downtown to Murfreesboro,,,,I am with satalac a light rail thats is made just like Marta will be best for nashville......

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

But you will be able to take commuter rail from Murfreesboro...

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Bus line will not work because its to far out and it would take a long time to get to downtown...Come on now, I do not wish to take a bus from Downtown to Murfreesboro,,,,I am with satalac a light rail thats is made just like Marta will be best for nashville......

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Good luck getting metropolitan Nashville residents - inside and outside of the city - to go along with the funding for that. I've spent 5 years of my life paying close attention to urban issues in this region and its went almost nowhere. Nashville is one of the most conservative metropolitan areas in the nation, people here don't accept the kinds of progressive thinking it requires to build an urban, transit-friendly, pro-active poverty control environment. In 2000 I had nothing but positive things to say about Nashville. But time and personal growth has taken its toll.

5 years is too long for me, let alone 20. Its amazing to wake up and realize this is 2005. Half of the 2000-2010 decade is already over and I'm still not where I planned on being at this point.

Just think about it. We've accomplished construction on a commuter rail line that has 4 trains in during the morning, 4 out in the evening. It goes to one of the most denseless, least attractive suburban corridors: Mt Juliet-Lebanon.

What is that going to do to enhance the central city? What will that do to revitalize communities? What are we really accomplishing?

Good questions, but I don't think I like the answers.

The only thing good that has happened is that the Plan of Nashville has come out, which may offer a guiding light for some changes.

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And I'm not going to be here for very long anyhow, this area is not accepting to people with my ideology. Its why my type tend to leave places like Nashville.

Good luck getting metropolitan Nashville residents - inside and outside of the city - to go along with the funding for that. I've spent 5 years of my life paying close attention to urban issues in this region and its went almost nowhere. Nashville is one of the most conservative metropolitan areas in the nation, people here don't accept the kinds of progressive thinking it requires to build an urban, transit-friendly, pro-active poverty control environment. In 2000 I had nothing but positive things to say about Nashville. But time and personal growth has taken its toll.

5 years is too long for me, let alone 20. Its amazing to wake up and realize this is 2005. Half of the 2000-2010 decade is already over and I'm still not where I planned on being at this point.

Just think about it. We've accomplished construction on a commuter rail line that has 4 trains in during the morning, 4 out in the evening. It goes to one of the most denseless, least attractive suburban corridors: Mt Juliet-Lebanon.

What is that going to do to enhance the central city? What will that do to revitalize communities? What are we really accomplishing?

Good questions, but I don't think I like the answers.

The only thing good that has happened is that the Plan of Nashville has come out, which may offer a guiding light for some changes.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Its very sad but true about the issue with urban planning.

Nashville is a good place for people who like the bible belt and grew up in Nashville. Nashville isn't the place for people that have a different point of view on religion nor Homosexuals.

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For me the real issues are the fact that so many people don't have a care in the world for reducing poverty and making the urban center a livable community. Some people are interested, but not enough.

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For me the real issues are the fact that so many people don't have a care in the world for reducing poverty and making the urban center a livable community. Some people are interested, but not enough.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i dunno, i've seen quite an upswing here. i've lived here for 22 years and i have seen a pretty big change for the better. nashville is even getting it's own gay district now. bill purcell has also talked about some plan to stop homelessness in the city. i believe that bill purcell is a good urban thinker and is always looking ahead for the city. i know it is frustrating though heckles because the changes still will take a long time. i understand why you'd want to move to an established city that already fits your needs.

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Nashville doesn't have a gay community yet. When the city condones it, starts putting up new street signs and rainbow flags down Church St, maybe...

If this is quite an upswing, then we are about 5% of the way to the top where things really will be better. Its going to take more then an upswing.

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Nashville doesn't have a gay community yet. When the city condones it, starts putting up new street signs and rainbow flags down Church St, maybe...

If this is quite an upswing, then we are about 5% of the way to the top where things really will be better. Its going to take more then an upswing.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

true, but progress is being made. not as quickly as it should, but an effort at least is being made.

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who said anything about tax paying, church going people who avoid living on public assistance? we're talking about helping those who have to live on public assistance.

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It goes beyond those living on public assistance, goes beyond that by far. Only a tiny fraction of the people that are poor in Nashville are in public housing.

And it isn't always about the poor. Just having a city that functions in multiple ways and is open to all classes is important.

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oh snap! Yea i agree. And there are some people in public housing with no intention of leaving, when there are people that really need to use it. It is really quite sad.

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I think they should destroy all public housing projects in Nashville and redesign them with a public/private partnership that includes mixed housing.

Afterwards there would need to be strict followup of vandalism and crime activity. The first time someone is seen destroying the property they should go to jail and spend some time to think about it. And jailtime shouldn't just be a place to nurture a more hateful, ignorant, disrepectful lifestyle. They should be made to work by going out into the communities and working for free to rebuild communities them instead of sitting in a jail cell. That's what a jail or prison sentence is for, in my opinion.

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