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Skyliner

Best SC Geographical Location

Based soley on the vastly diverse geography in South Carolina, what part do you most like?  

21 members have voted

  1. 1. Based soley on the vastly diverse geography in South Carolina, what part do you most like?

    • Mountains/Foothills
      7
    • Piedmont
      3
    • Coastal Plain
      11


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The choices are simple. Many people I've spoken with on this subject have a preference as to which part of the state they most like. Many also have said that they enjoy all parts of the state's geography, but prefer certain places at certain times, and other places at other times.

Please feel free to elaborate on this subject and add anything to it, if you'd like. :)

The following desciption is from http://www.netstate.com/states/geography/sc_geography.htm

Three geographic land areas define South Carolina; the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, and the Blue Ridge region. South Carolinians simplify this somewhat by referring to the eastern Atlantic Coastal Plain as the South Carolina Low Country and the Piedmont and the Blue Ridge region as Up Country.

Two thirds of South Carolina is covered by the Atlantic Coastal Plain, from the Atlantic Ocean extending to the west. The land rises gradually from the southeast to the northwest.

An area of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, defined as extending from the coast about 70 miles inland, is referred to as the Outer Coastal Plain. This area is quite flat. Many rivers can be found in the Outer Coastal Plain with swamps near the coast that extend inland along the rivers. An area called the Inner Coastal Plain consists of rolling hills. This is where South Carolina's most fertile soils are found.

In the central Atlantic Coastal Plain is an area of forested land called the Pine Barrens. On the western edge of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, running from the southwest to the northeast, is a line of sand hills. These sand hills may have once marked the eastern coast of South Carolina suggesting that the entire Atlantic Coastal Plain may have once been under water.

To the northwest of the Atlantic Coastal Plain is the Piedmont. The Piedmont is marked by higher elevations, from 400 to 1,200 feet above sea level and reaching 1,400 above sea level on its western edge. The landscape consists of rolling hills; gentler in the east and more hilly to the west and northwest. The border between the Piedmont region and the Atlantic Coastal Plain is called the Fall Line to mark the line where the upland rivers "fall" to the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain.

The Blue Ridge covers the northwestern corner of South Carolina. Part of the larger Blue Ridge that extends from southern Pennsylvania south to Georgia, the South Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains are lower and less rugged than the mountains in North Carolina. The forest covered Blue Ridge Mountains of South Carolina rarely exceed 3,000 feet above sea level. The highest point in South Carolina, Sassafras Mountain, reaches 3,554 feet into the sky.

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I prefer the low country. One of the best undiscovered places in SC, IMO, that is untouched by tourism and rampant development, is Edisto Beach. You can still go to the docks where the fishing boats come in and get a scrumpious just caught fried fish sandwich and eat it while watching the porporses play in the water just feet away.

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All 3 areas have cool places. The mountains and the beach are obvious. In metro Columbia, for instance, you have flatlands and Congaree National Park in Lower Richland County, Sandhills and Pine Trees in Eastern and Northeastern Richland, much of Kershaw and Southern Lexington Counties. From Downtown Columbia North and Northwest is rolling hills and hardwoods.

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Columbia's location on the fall line gives it a very unique geography.

I will always prefer the piedmont. I was born and raised there :)

I have a problem with those labels. The piedmont is the same as the foothills- piedmont being french for "foot (pied) of the mountain (mont)." Just being picky :)

This is an interesting way to divvy up the state.

Where can you do that on Edisto Beach? I've spent some time there, and I have never seen that.

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I also really enjoy Edisto Island. That is my favorite place to visit along the SC coast, mostly because it seems to have remained about the same for the past 50 years. You're right about the seafood. Absolutely the best ever! :thumbsup: I've been over to the shrimpboat docks and talked with the fishermen before. What an awesome experience! They are so down to earth, and extremely laid back. I highly recommend this place for your rustic seaside vacation. :)

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I have to say that I am suprised at the current results of this poll. I didn't think the Lowcountry would be faring so well.

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I prefer living in the Upstate, but I sure miss aspects of the Low Country. Mainly fishing on the tidals creeks and rivers.

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:rolleyes: Yes, I'm showing my bias, but I can't help it. Home is where the heart is, I guess. I will always be a sucker for quick access to the beach and ocean.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

My motto is if I have to move anywhere in the US, it will have to be a coastal state. Thank God I'm from one!!!!

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>I will always prefer the piedmont. I was born and raised there :)

As do I with the fall line. US 1 traveres through the fall line in both NC and SC which ive traveled the entire US 1 highway from VA to GA. I like how some counties have oak/clay formation in one part of the county while the other side is sand/pines. Moore County, NC definatly represents that (we're the northern end of the Sandhills region btw) but do any counties in the Columbia area have that or anywhere in SC? I would think Richland or Kershaw Counties are likely canadates because of its large size from west to east.

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Yeah were I grew up in St. Andrews (NW Richland) the soil there has some red clay (peidmont), & sandy black soil combinations (sandhills), eastern Richland Co. & Kershaw you will find the sandhills. The sandhills become really obvious when you are riding down I-20 in eastern Richland & Kershaw Counties.

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