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krazeeboi

How do North Carolinians perceive us?

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Seems that most of the people on this site are well-educated concerning things about urban politics and culture and all that. However, as a South Carolinian who is employed in North Carolina (Charlotte to be exact), sometimes when I mention that I'm from South Carolina, it seems as though the North Carolinians would like to think they're "superior" to us. I know one guy who lives in W-S who attempted to take a cheap shot at SC by mentioning that Alabama's four largest cities were all larger than our largest city, Columbia. When I told him that we have our annexation laws to thank for that, he ignored me and went off on a tangent. So, from my fellow South Carolinians, how do you think we are viewed by North Carolinians, culturally and otherwise? Personally I think there's not much difference (other than size).

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Anyone that claims a state is better just because of the size of its municipalities is a moron IMO. Tell them to check their MSA stats before they say that.

I have heard NC people trash us, but mainly because we are sterotyped as having a poor education system. And while it is certainly not the best, it is not the worst. We are usually towards the bottom of the stack in most things, which is why we are percieved that way.

Every state has its baggage. But lets not turn this into a state bashing event :)

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I grew up in SC but have lived most of my adult life in Charlotte. Here are some of my perceptions.

Concerning Charlotte. They say the same thing about anyone from outside the county. I can't tell you how many times I have heard "stuff" about Cabarrus and Gaston counties from some Charlottans. (I know it supposed to be Charlotteans. LOL) There are many people in the city who would never think to cross the county line to have dinner, go shopping or experience anything else available in these places. Personally I think it is their loss but people make their choices.

Its interesting the most negative comments however are reserved for those in Raleigh. Most likely because that area is the biggest challenger to Charlotte's status. The people in Charlotte love SC in comparison. Almost as much as they love themselves.

I find this same attitude prevalent in much of NC. It was quite surprising to me when I move here from SC because the same just doesn't exist in SC. Raleigh, the Triad and Charlotte might as well be on the moon, mars and venus considering how much interaction there is between the places. They completely ignore each other for fear they might get upstaged or something. BTW, I don't notice this in Asheville or Wilmington.

In many ways I prefer the "culture" (not exactly the right word) of SC to that found in NC. Ironically, when I was growing up in Myrtle Beach, most of the natives would look down on tourists from NC. (most considered them hicks)

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I am native to NC and I have never lived in SC. I hate it when people in the national media say "The Carolinas" because I think it takes away the unique identities that North and South Carolina have. The two states are quite different and might as well have completely different names.

Growing up, my impression of SC was like that of a resort--the SC coast was the place to be during the summer :)

People in the urban centers of SC strike me as educated "everyday" people. They come in all shapes and sizes with different attitudes and different hairstyles. :) My impression of them is no different than that of any other typical metro. I think that rural SC is maybe a bit less sophisticated (for lack of a better word) than rural NC. That is probably a fair assumption based on education and skill levels.

When I think of SC, I think of very long drives in the middle of a forest accompanied by an occasional gas station. It seems that more of a void exists between cities/towns in SC. That is only an impression and there are exceptions of course. My familiarity with certain remote parts of NC makes my analysis less than objective.

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Growing up in Columbia I never really considered myself being disadvandaged growing up in SC. I never said to myself, "man I wish I lived NC instead of SC", both states were pretty much in the same boat as far as my perception goes. I know NC residents will argue with that statement but I'm okay with it. Alot of NC cities remind me of SC cities it's just that two of NC major metros have 2 similar medium sized cities next too each other, while SC has just the one (ex. Greensboro/ Winston-Salem; Columbia). Separate Greensboro and Winston-Salem are similair in size to Columbia (Columbia, Charleston, and Greenville have larger urbanized areas than both Greensboro & Winston-Salem). Of course if you combine GWS's old MSA or new CSA then that area is larger. The only cities that are at the next level are Charlotte and Raleigh (and even Raleigh is debatable but I'm sure I couldn't tell Raleighites that). I will say that Raleigh-Durham does feel more like a continuous metro, meaning there is not a whole lot of undeveloped area between the two cities at least on I-40 anyway. I do think that NC is more progressive and forward thinking than SC as a whole, there are a few places in SC that are a little more free spirited, but it is SC afterall. Given the two states there is really no reason SC shouldn't get the type of recognition NC has recieving the past 10 years or so it's just that SC has been content being local while NC has made strive for national attention. Things in SC are changing though. Our state and it's leaders are finally beginning to realize that it doesn't matter if you are #1 in SC the only thing that matters is getting yourself out there nationally. The state really needs to play to its strengths, outside of Florida I can't think of any other state in the SE that has more popular coastal tourist destinations, & according to the census anyway that is where the fastest growth is being seen (Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Beaufort-Hilton Head). SC is working hard to establish a national automotive/ transportation cluster, as well as hydrogen research. This is good but I think we should look at Michigan and remember what happend when the automotive industry decides to move someplace cheaper and leaves the area high and dry. We saw what happened when textiles washed up. As a whole I think the state is taking steps in the right direction and I think the numbers in terrms of growth will reflect that. In the latest census we were the nations 13th fastest growing state (%) four spots behind NC, so I think that puts us ahead of the curve.

I know SC as a whole may not have the best public education but there are certain school districts that can run with any of the nations best.

In closing, I've always considered the Carolinas as a whole not so much as two states. At least that's been my personal experience when I have left the region (SE),( ex. "I've been to Charlotte, what part of SC is that in?, or I've heard of Myrtle Beach isn't that in NC?") I do know that both states have extremely proud residents and so most arguments will be one sided. With that said be it Sandlapper or Tarheel it's all the same Carolina in my eyes.

Okay feel free to cast stones now! ;)

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Many times, it does seem to be the case that it is primarily Charlotteans that have the ego of sorts. I've heard North Carolinians from other parts of the state say that when Charlotteans ask them where they're originally from and they something other Charlotte, Charlotteans somewhat turn up their noses and/or frown at the answers.

This is just a theory, but perhaps it's common for citizens who live in a major urban area close to state lines to perceive themselves just a bit superior to those who live just across the border. Maybe some Greenvillians, Aikenites (don't know if those are the proper terms or not, LOL), or Jasper County residents can shed some light on this.

As far as statistics are concerned, both Carolinas have about the same number of urban and rural areas. I remember once when I was riding with a friend and his friend from his home in Salisbury to Charlotte, and they were talking about how "country" South Carolina is. I told him to look outside his window, because frankly, I see nothing even slightly metropolitan about Rowan County (Charlotte MSA inclusion notwithstanding).

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Well the nice thing about this conversation is that we can have it at all. (and I don't know of any other forums where this would be possible. :P )

I think many Charlotteans feel closer to SC and than to the rest of NC. Generally Charlotte battles the rest of the NC and its SC that gives more support.

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Everytime I hear someone get angry over someone's driving, they usually result to name calling, where "south carolina driver" is the name used, LOL! Not to say that SC drivers are all that bad...I've heard that SC folks call bad drivers NC drivers so I guess we get nowhere.

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I think many Charlotteans feel closer to SC and than  to the rest of NC.  Generally Charlotte battles the rest of the NC and its SC that gives more support.

Clearly evident in the road systems leading into Charlotte from SC. It's almost as if you're going away from Charlotte when you cross the state line heading into Charlotte.

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I think that rural SC is maybe a bit less sophisticated (for lack of a better word) than rural NC. That is probably a fair assumption based on education and skill levels.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You've obviously never been to Coinjock, NC. Rural is as rualy does everywhere. I haven't seen any difference (good or bad).

Everytime I hear someone get angry over someone's driving, they usually result to name calling, where "south carolina driver" is the name used, LOL!  Not to say that SC drivers are all that bad...I've heard that SC folks call bad drivers NC drivers so I guess we get nowhere.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

In SC we say NC drivers are bad. Every single time I have ever been to NC I get cut off or almost clipped by one of your insane drivers! That happens alot on the interstante where ever I might be. In SC we may drive slow, but its not as wreckless. I have heard a yankee professor of complain that when the light truns green drivers here just sit there.

On the otherside, GA drives really freaking fast or horribly slow, with no inbetween whatsoever.

Its all in good fun I guess. Perhaps people don't want to admit how their own state is when it comes to this type of thing.

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In SC we may drive slow, but its not as wreckless.

We have more important things to do in NC than get behind one of you SC drivers. Why is it that folks from SC drive incredibly slow? It's a hazard to do so in Charlotte! Afterall, SC did at one time (not sure if they still do) have MINIMUM speed limits posted, apparently it was a problem so they made it against the law to go under a certain speed, hahaha! :rofl:

:P

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Interesting...on my way to work into Charlotte, most of the time, it's me, the "slow" South Carolinian, who's passing all the NC drivers.

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Hey I don't know about Rock Hill, but Columbia has a need for speed. Driving on the highway there isn't so much about doing the speed limit as it is too keep up with the flow of traffic. So if traffic is doing 80 your'e doing 80, or getting passed on the inside by the car behind you.

You hit the nail on the head as far as my experience with GA drivers, Spartan.

Either theyr'e going 40 in a 65 or there going 140 in a 65.

Neo, you can go to Myrtle Beach and see all the slow moving NC-linians' you can handle. I have flash backs of me bobing and weeving in and out of lanes just to get back and forth to work. ;)

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Interesting...on my way to work into Charlotte, most of the time, it's me, the "slow" South Carolinian, who's passing all the NC drivers.

I'm sure they moved here from SC. :P

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Hey I don't know about Rock Hill, but Columbia has a need for speed. Driving on the highway there isn't so much about doing the speed limit as it is too keep up with the flow of traffic. So if traffic is doing 80 your'e doing 80, or getting passed on the inside by the car behind you.

This is certainly true. I'm most familiar with traffic through Columbia on I-77, and you're pretty much accurate on that one. I would probably say the same thing about the times I've been on I-26 as well.

I'm sure they moved here from SC.  :P

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Or perhaps Wadesboro or Shelby. :blush:

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We have more important things to do in NC than get behind one of you SC drivers.  Why is it that folks from SC drive incredibly slow?  It's a hazard to do so in Charlotte!  Afterall, SC did at one time (not sure if they still do) have MINIMUM speed limits posted, apparently it was a problem so they made it against the law to go under a certain speed, hahaha!  :rofl:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You yankees up there are just always in a hurry. Slow down and see what there is to see :P

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I can say based on experiences, its not unusual for SC motorists to be going over 80mph on I-26 and I-77. They pass me in teh passing lane like theres no tomorrow.

Yea SC does have it share of slow drivers but dosent every state?! NJ motorists on rural highways are the slowest drivers ive ever seen! Tonight coming back from work, they were driving 30 in a 40 zone. Sadly so, its common to see that in the Garden State.

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In the four months that I lived in Wilmington, the drivers seemed better and running red lights was much less frequent than in SC. The troopers are less lenient in NC too. I got a $50 ticket in '87 for having my brights on! Insurance rates are a lot higher in SC, so I think that settles that issue.

As someone else stated, I have found the people in Wilmington and Asheville to be down-to-earth. Asheville is a joy to visit, and the mindset there is a breath of fresh air next to my home of Greenville SC.

No offense to anyone, but most of the people I have met in Charlotte seem to think a lot of themselves and their city. If they would travel more, they would see that they and their city are not as unique and sophisticated as they think. However, maybe that attitude has been largely responsible for Charlotte being the over-achiever that it has been for 40 years. They certainly make more money than people in most cities, and it has grown sharply in every category.

Outside of the South, people do tend to mix up the Carolinas and the cities within them. Unless one of the states changes its name, that isn't going to change. I'm sure people in North and South Dakota experience the same thing.

The two states are pretty different in many ways. North Carolinians are much more willing to allow the state government to tax them and regulate them. Sometimes that bad, but for the most part it's good. Just look at seatbelt laws, helmet laws, fireworks, taxes and tax policy, annexation laws, liquor laws, you name it.

NC state government is much, much more progressive than SC's state government. Among the general population though, it's much more even IMO. I always got annoyed when an NCer would say something about Strom Thurmond, while Jesse Helms was still serving NC. Fortunately, that is in the past now.

Both states still cling too tightly to some negative, stereotypically southern ideas and traditions.

North Ccarolina isn't as 'forward-thinking' as a whole as they like to think, and South Carolina as a whole isn't as 'backward-thinking' as they like to think it is.

South Carolina isn't as 'forward-thinking' as it might like to think and is more 'backward-thinking' than it likes to admit to.

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When i was visiting Wilmington/Myrtle Beach frequently the last 2 years, it was not unusual for some kids in Myrtle Beach to get NC insurance because it was much cheaper.

Big cities tend to be arrogant and to themselves. A lot of native Charlotteans are in Pinehurst to escape all of that to a tranquil/easy going way of life.

Correct me if im wrong but i beleive NC is the most taxed state in the south. Its good that we have improved services and attract new people to move in because we try to be very progressive but its bad that we have to pay more taxes.

I dont know much about Senator Thurmond but ive never liked Jesse Helms, im glad hes gone!

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When i was visiting Wilmington/Myrtle Beach frequently the last 2 years, it was not unusual for some kids in Myrtle Beach to get NC insurance because it was much cheaper.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That would be very unusual. A NC auto insurer will not write a policy for a SC resident and vice versa. And the foolish person attempting to lie about their address risks very serious consequences if they ever had an accident.

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They get a friend in NC, own the title and insurance, they just " BORROW " the car even though its there. Or have a family member that lives in NC. NJ does that a lot with going into PA for dirt cheap auto insurance by owning property or knowing someone.

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They get a friend in NC, own the title and insurance, they just " BORROW " the car even though its there. Or have a family member that lives in NC. NJ does that a lot with going into PA for dirt cheap auto insurance by owning property or knowing someone.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well whoever owns the title on the vehicle is the one liable for any accidents on the vehicle. And of course is the one who actually owns the vehicle and can sell it as well. I really can't see how there is a great deal of this going on as there are just too many ways that "friends" can mess up this arrangement.

I certainly wouldn't take title on a car so a friend of mine could get cheap insurance form SC. I'd rather just give them the money to make up the difference in the premium. The risk is far far less.

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I've grown up in the Charlotte area and say in my personal opinion The Carolina's are very attached to one another. The Dakotas and Virginias have nothing on us. I don't feel "out of state" when in SC, I feel right at home and I feel the same way when SC people are here in Charlotte, I consider them local because they probably live in Fort Mill or somewhere. Many businesses in Charlotte fly both state flags to represent all of there employees, and many times in Charlotte you will spot a car with an NC plate and an SC state flag sticker. SC has its pros and cons and sometimes I am proud as a Carolinian to be associated with it other times I'm not but either way I feel as if I am associated with it. The same is true for me with NC. I think the nation likes to lump us together and I don't mind that since I think it gives us a character of solidarity not found in other states. Also, our two most nationally known metros (Charlotte and Myrtle Beach) are both practically state line straddlers so a bit of confusion is almost expected from non-Carolinians.

Of course things are different for those of us who live on the state line, obviously I may feel more attached to SC than someone in Winston-Salem. But I expect the Charlotte Metro to continue to become more "Carolina" and not worry so much about NC vs. SC. Charlotte enjoys being "The Carolinas' Largest city" and loves to be the "First in the Carolinas'" to get something or to have "The Carolinas' only..." I think Charlotte will push the image of being The Carolinas' metropolis. There have also been ideas of the two states working together to bring jobs to the Charlotte region that wouldn't otherwise come by having both states combine incentive giving power. This would create an incentive so large other states couldn't touch it and hopefully both states would reap the rewards. I've also heard thoughts about a Charlotte Metro area in-state tuition zone that would allow NC residents in the Charlotte metro to attend SC universities in the metro (like Winthrop) at in-state tuition costs and vis-versa with York and Lancaster counties allowed to do the same with NC schools in the metro like UNCC. Of course these are all just ideas, nothing hard, and I don't know the details of how any of these things would logically work but the fact that these ideas do exist does prove how truly connected the two states are in the Charlotte Metro at least.

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