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stinkweed

Downtown Population

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I believe the downtown population of center city Philadelphia is 80,000 (I'll get the exact number). It's the third largest downtown in the U.S. behind Chicago and New York. What are some of the others? I'd be interested to know?

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As of the 2000 census, Providence's Downcity had 2,678 on 0.51 square miles of land. But with the rapid rate of development Downcity, we should see a sizable boost in that number by 2010.

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I believe Hartford's downtown population is a measly 1,200. :( (maybe the smallest in the country for a midsize/large city)

Good news is that the population is forecasted to triple in the next 3 years. :thumbsup: 500+ apartments/condos are under construction downtown as of right now with hundreds more starting construction at Adriaen's Landing very soon.

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Charlotte's downtown population stands at about 10,000. There are roughly 1700 residential units planned over the next 4-5 years. With more projects expected to make "formal annocments" the number of planned units should grow higher.

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The closest I found for Orlando (from cityoforlando.com):

17,000 downtown residents in 1620 acres (2.5 sq. miles).

3,000 residential units planned for the next 24 months.

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most of Des Moines population lives in Downtown, about 50,000 people live there, kinda funky aint it?

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From Fannie Mae Foundation, which sounds pretty reliable.

Downtowns Vary

Like census tracts themselves, downtowns vary widely in population size and geographic area (table 1). San Antonio is the geographically largest downtown at 5.5 square miles, while the downtowns in Norfolk, Cincinnati, and Lexington are each just 0.8 square miles. Boston had the largest downtown population in 2000, with almost 80,000, while Norfolk had just under 3,000.

notes03_table_1.jpg

maybe NYC isn't on the list because the whole thing is downtown?

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Wow, what a drop off after philly and boston. I always thought they were the two best cities. I can't believe chicago's downtown is only 30,000 though. Something doesn't make sense.

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For Detroit, the best I can figure is that there are now about 6500 people living downtown. If we could just get the rest of these loft projects going...

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It's really all about how you define downtown, like portland said. some people include large swaths of residential in the "downtown" while others are only the cbd.

what is considered "downtown" would be as interesting as how many people live there.

now, what i want to know... was bret15 just making a funny?

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It's really all about how you define downtown, like portland said.  some people include large swaths of residential in the "downtown" while others are only the cbd.

what is considered "downtown" would be as interesting as how many people live there.

now, what i want to know... was bret15 just making a funny?

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Toronto's downtown ranges from 35,000 to 100,000+ depending on definition out of a city core of about 600,000 (officially it's 2.5 million but that's essentially suburbs that were merged into one big city in 1998). A lot of suburbanites refer to the whole city-proper (prior to the merger) as "downtown". Calling the whole city-proper "downtown" seems to be a very Toronto thing, but I could be wrong.

BTW, a more generous definition of downtown Chicago includes the Near North, South and West Sides as well as the traditional Loop - which comes to about 150,000, I think

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Toronto's downtown ranges from 35,000 to 100,000+ depending on definition out of a city core of about 600,000 (officially it's 2.5 million but that's essentially suburbs that were merged into one big city in 1998).  A lot of suburbanites refer to the whole city-proper (prior to the merger) as "downtown".  Calling the whole city-proper "downtown" seems to be a very Toronto thing, but I could be wrong.

BTW, a more generous definition of downtown Chicago includes the Near North, South and West Sides as well as the traditional Loop - which comes to about 150,000, I think

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150,000 would seem more acurate to me. I'll try to find what exactly Phillt deems "Center City" and how big it actually is.

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150,000 would seem more acurate to me.  I'll try to find what exactly Phillt deems "Center City" and how big it actually is.

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If you click on the Fannie May link it already gives downtown area and density. I think this is probably a better measure as Mattnf was saying.

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Does anybody know the DT pop for Miami or San Fran? I'm certain San Fran must be close to Boston and Philly, and maybe even higher. Miami's is growing rapidly and must be getting up there too.

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I seem to remember seeing those Boston numbers before. What Bostonians consider Downtown and what is considered Downtown for statistical purposes are two different things. That 80,000 I believe includes the North End and Beacon Hill, which most Bostonians would not consider Downtown.

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I seem to remember seeing those Boston numbers before. What Bostonians consider Downtown and what is considered Downtown for statistical purposes are two different things. That 80,000 I believe includes the North End and Beacon Hill, which most Bostonians would not consider Downtown.

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Bostonians wouldn't consider them "downtown" but they would consider them 'in town'.

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Bostonians wouldn't consider them "downtown" but they would consider them 'in town'.

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True, even when I lived in Allston and Brighton, I considered those areas 'Boston.' As in, "I'm going into Boston." Even though I lived in Boston. :blush:

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Charlotte has 10K in 1.5 square miles with over 1700 units under construction or planned to begin construction in the next year or so. The population in this 1.5 square mile area is projected to be between 15 and 20K in 5 years.

These numbers DO NOT include the seasonal influx of students to Johnson and Wales University (5000K in 5 years) or the proposed Wake Forest University Business School or Queens College expansion.

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Info on Pittsburgh:

An article in one of the local papers this week stated that 3,300 people live in the 0.8 square-mile Downtown. This only covers the CBD.

In addition to this, there are two new high rise residential buildings going up and several other residential conversion projects underway.

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Charlotte has 10K in 1.5 square miles with over 1700 units under construction or planned to begin construction in the next year or so.  The population in this 1.5 square mile area is projected to be between 15 and 20K in 5 years. 

These numbers DO NOT include the seasonal influx of students to Johnson and Wales University (5000K in 5 years) or the proposed Wake Forest University Business School or Queens College expansion.

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Is this true? I only ask because in 1990 charlotte had just over 6K and in 2000 it only grew by a very small amount. It would be awesome if it had all the sudden jumped by 40% in just 5 years.

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