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Spartan

Urban Kudzu

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As a Southerner you are probably familiar with kudzu- that vine that can't be killed and that expands to 'consume' anything stationary. I came accross this site the shows kudzu in Atlanta. I didn't want to show the guy's entire website, but its very telling. There is alot of kudzu in my hometown, and most towns I have been to. I have actually witnessed it devout a house over the years. It would be interesting to document all types of urban kudzu.

kudzu_ATL.jpg

http://www.jjanthony.com/kudzu

Check out this site for more Urban Kudzu.

Here is the Kudzu Site.

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if you wanna see a city that is being overrun with kudzu, you should go to knoxville. it's gotten out of control over there.

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if you wanna see a city that is being overrun with kudzu, you should go to knoxville. it's gotten out of control over there.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Damn right....the river banks are coated in the stuff...its hard to see it right now, because its still winter...

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In case you did not know, this plant was imported from Japan and planted during the depression as a WPA project to reclaim land that had been laid to waste by the Civil War decades earlier. In those days, the concepts of introducing non-native plants to a local ecology did not exist.

I've seen similar urban kudzu in the Tokyo area. :lol:

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Florida doesn't seem to have as much as Mississippi, Alabam and Georgia do. I've seen fields of it in those states that just stretch for nearly a mile completely unbroken.

Then again as Metro pointed out, being a civil war relect of sorts, that explains its centralized location.

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I've heard of them using goats. Also Kudzu tea is supposed to make a great hangover cure. The most amazing thing about it for me is that it dies off every winter. Only to come back in spring with more coverage than before.

We had a lot of Kudzu in Tallahassee and other parts of the panhandle.

None down in Miami. Too hot I guess.

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In case you did not know, this plant was imported from Japan and planted during the depression as a WPA project to reclaim land that had been laid to waste by the Civil War decades earlier.  In those days, the concepts of introducing non-native plants to a local ecology did not exist. 

I've seen similar urban kudzu in the Tokyo area.    :lol:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It was supposed to help stop erosion, which was a real problem because so many of the trees had been cleared. Kudzu was the perfect answer, and it is still working hard today :)

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That stuff scares me but maybe that's because when I was little my older siblings teased me about it coming to life and stalking me. I'm sure if traffic jammed long enough on the 75/85 connector, they'd need garden sheers to move the vehicles. lol :unsure:

P.S. If everyone deserted Atlanta, how long would it would take before all the highrises are draped in that stuff?

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That stuff scares me but maybe that's because when I was little my older siblings teased me about it coming to life and stalking me. I'm sure if traffic jammed long enough on the 75/85 connector, they'd need garden sheers to move the vehicles. lol :unsure:

P.S. If everyone deserted Atlanta, how long would it would take before all the highrises are draped in that stuff?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

2 weeks. That stuff grows fast. Ok maybe not 2 weeks, but it wouldn't take long. That would be a cool sight to see.

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