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sleepy

Memphis: New Main residential

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This is a dilapidated block of downtown Memphis that is currently undergoing renovation, including a 29 story residential tower:

From http://www.downtownmemphis.com/domain/news.../developer.html

ajproject.jpg

A $6.4 million renovation of four historic buildings on New Main will bring 36 upscale residential units to the Downtown Core. New Main is the block on Main Street between Union and Gayoso avenues that is undergoing a $56 million transformation to turn vacant buildings and lots into homes for more than 500 people.

When complete, the project will contain 5,000-sf of retail on the ground floor.

This marks the second project on the New Main block for this development team which undertook the renovation of The Cornerstone Apartments, a 15-unit apartment complex that was the first completed project on New Main. Wang's Mandarin House will occupy the first floor of this building.

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That's great to hear. This seems to be a growing trend in Nashville and Memphis....taking old/historic buildings and finding new uses for them (rather than just razing them).

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Well, it's certainly a good trend, but I don't think it's necessarily recent. Most of downtown Memphis--and I would suspect much of downtown Nashville as well--has been in nationally recognized historic district status since the mid-seventies.

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I am glad to see Memphis getting a long needed face-lift. There are plenty of buildings down town that could benefit from being turned in to residential property. Down town Memphis needs to shape up. If it could keep the crime down, I think revenue would pick up even more. I would love to watch Memphis turn into the next "Southern Living" type city.

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sleepy's right, this has been happening since the seventies. Many old buildings became law firms, architect offices and such. Most recently the main emphasis is residential and offices. It's a nice rebirth, but not the first.

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I am glad to see Memphis getting a long needed face-lift. There are plenty of buildings down town that could benefit from being turned in to residential property. Down town Memphis needs to shape up. If it could keep the crime down, I think revenue would pick up even more. I would love to watch Memphis turn into the next "Southern Living" type city.

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Just about all old buildings that could be turned into residential/retail/offices have been.

The only exception is that block of Main Street and the Sterrick Building. Most everything being built down there now is new residential.

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Any renderings of the 29 story tower?

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Yes, not a particularly attractive building either.

Old rendering and location:

38809987.jpg

New rendering:

37205121.jpg

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Have you been downtown lately? Have you seen all that's going on? Over $2 billion in new construction and renovation! They can't build enough residential property to keep up with the demand. Condos are selling out before the plans are even completed. 71 houses just sold in Harbor Town in an hour-and-a-half. And the crime you speak of...the Downtown precint, according to Memphis Crime Commission stats, is the safest precint in the entire city.

I am glad to see Memphis getting a long needed face-lift. There are plenty of buildings down town that could benefit from being turned in to residential property. Down town Memphis needs to shape up. If it could keep the crime down, I think revenue would pick up even more. I would love to watch Memphis turn into the next "Southern Living" type city.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

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