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dcluley98    531
41 minutes ago, codypet said:

Cool looking trusses.   Good use of attic space.

They are timber trusses that will be completely exposed in "loft" style vaulted ceilings. They have renderings on their website. These are cool looking residences. I wish I could afford one, haha!

 

Kitchen Loft.jpg

Living loft.jpg

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UngaBungalow    111

Wow, I love those. I wish the windows on the far wall were symmetrical though, with a second large paine that went to the ceiling. I guess asymmetry is in though. 

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alex    426
3 hours ago, codypet said:

Kobe.  Construction will begin in 2035.

Sounds about right. Can't wait to take my grandkids. 

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codypet    128
3 hours ago, jrs2 said:

^^

LOL.  2035.  really?

They've been teasing a Kobe in this neighborhood since 2001.   First the site was where Office Depot stands today.  Then it moved to the spot next to Dollar Tree where Popeye's/Bento will be.  Now they own the site of the Chevron and the restaurant next to it.   

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JFW657    1080

Anyone else notice how the end of this truss rafter abuts the divider wall between the units?

20170810_180228.thumb.jpg.a5c8c3a52c41e6

Looks like it will create a sort of trough along the divider walls over each unit.

Even with a built in gutter system in place, that seems like a serious roof leak just waiting to happen.

I used to work in a commercial building in the 33rd St Industrial Park off of LB McLeod, in which a similar situation existed. It had a gable roof with the ridge running the length of the building and the slope terminating on the back side of a front parapet wall and with a gutter that ran along the back of the wall. This placed the gutter above the interior of the building . Once it started to leak, it soon turned into Niagara Falls. We'd come to work in the morning and splash water with every step.The roofing company they hired to fix it, couldn't seem to completely stop the leak even after several attempts.

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aent    79
5 hours ago, JFW657 said:

Anyone else notice how the end of this truss rafter abuts the divider wall between the units?

20170810_180228.thumb.jpg.a5c8c3a52c41e6

Looks like it will create a sort of trough along the divider walls over each unit.

Even with a built in gutter system in place, that seems like a serious roof leak just waiting to happen.

I used to work in a commercial building in the 33rd St Industrial Park off of LB McLeod, in which a similar situation existed. It had a gable roof with the ridge running the length of the building and the slope terminating on the back side of a front parapet wall and with a gutter that ran along the back of the wall. This placed the gutter above the interior of the building . Once it started to leak, it soon turned into Niagara Falls. We'd come to work in the morning and splash water with every step.The roofing company they hired to fix it, couldn't seem to completely stop the leak even after several attempts.

Yup, this is nearly guaranteed to leak, the question is how badly. Gutters are typically designed to reduce and limit the amount of runoff in a particular location. They aren't designed to not prevent any water from getting out of them, water easily splashes out, and they're not always water tight to begin with, its not a requirement for them to work as intended. They aren't drains, they're water redirection.

Edited by aent
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On 7/21/2017 at 11:05 AM, alex said:

Athens hosting the 2004 Olympics was pretty great for its infrastructure:

 

I've always thought Atlanta exploded in growth pretty much because of the Olympics and the exposure it brought to the area.

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HankStrong    360

I think when a country or region stretches to get the Olympics, it dooms the area.  If an area actually plans and incorporates the Olympics into the city, they thrive.

There are countless photo collections online of abandoned Olympic sites that show the bad decisions. 

Atlanta is a smart example.  Basically, the only places that are gone in 2017 were planned replacements.  Fulton County stadium doesn't exist (it was used in the 1996 Olympics) because it was replaced by the Georgia Dome, but they didn't tear it down until after the Olympics so it could still be used.  Any infrastructure improvements still exist and have been expanded.  The old Omni (HOME OF PRO WRESTLING FOR DECADES like the GCW, WWF/WWE, NWA, etc... WOOOOOOOOOOOOO get well soon Ric Flair!) was due to be demo'd and they just waited until after the Olympics to do so.

L.A. is another solid example.  London is another.  Vancouver is another.

Like I said, though, there are plenty of bad examples.  We're looking at you Rio and Sochi!

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spenser1058    834
3 hours ago, HankStrong said:

I think when a country or region stretches to get the Olympics, it dooms the area.  If an area actually plans and incorporates the Olympics into the city, they thrive.

There are countless photo collections online of abandoned Olympic sites that show the bad decisions. 

Atlanta is a smart example.  Basically, the only places that are gone in 2017 were planned replacements.  Fulton County stadium doesn't exist (it was used in the 1996 Olympics) because it was replaced by the Georgia Dome, but they didn't tear it down until after the Olympics so it could still be used.  Any infrastructure improvements still exist and have been expanded.  The old Omni (HOME OF PRO WRESTLING FOR DECADES like the GCW, WWF/WWE, NWA, etc... WOOOOOOOOOOOOO get well soon Ric Flair!) was due to be demo'd and they just waited until after the Olympics to do so.

L.A. is another solid example.  London is another.  Vancouver is another.

Like I said, though, there are plenty of bad examples.  We're looking at you Rio and Sochi!

The IOC really, really didn't want Atlanta to get the games in 1996, especially since it was done on a bit of a wing and a prayer. HankStrong covers how well it actually worked out (using the housing for local colleges, for example - GSU has really come into its own as a result, especially). As Hank mentioned, it's especially ironic given the IOC's grand vision of breaking the bank to be awarded the Games and how disastrous that vision has often been.

It's also important to note how vital it is to have friends. Certainly, Billy Payne was tireless in his work to get things going, but it was the influence of longtime Olympic sponsor Coke (headquartered in Atlanta), as well as by former UN ambassador Andrew Young and former president Jimmy Carter (good Georgians, of course) that turned the tide. That's important to keep in mind if we would like to host one day.

Edited by spenser1058

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dcluley98    531
3 hours ago, HankStrong said:

Atlanta is a smart example.  Basically, the only places that are gone in 2017 were planned replacements.  Fulton County stadium doesn't exist (it was used in the 1996 Olympics) because it was replaced by the Georgia Dome, but they didn't tear it down until after the Olympics so it could still be used.  Any infrastructure improvements still exist and have been expanded. 

 

I agree with your general statement about it working better when planned with the city. The student housing for GT used to house athletes, Centennial Olympic Park, using/enhancing existing venues etc are great examples of this. 

Your statement on the stadiums is incorrect, however. Fulton County Stadium was used for the Olympics and they built Centennial Olympic Stadium for the main Track and Field venue.  This was planned to convert to Turner Field as the new home for the Braves after the games, and Fulton County Stadium was demolished afterwards. The Georgia Dome was already in existence, built in 1992 and home of the Falcons. It was also used during the Olympics for basketball and gymnastics. 

Turner Field was replaced by SunTrust Park for the Braves this year at a cost of $622 million after 20 years. The stadium was renovated once again to become Georgia State Stadium for college football, with Georgia State vacating the to be demolished Georgia Dome. The Georgia Dome was replaced by the upcoming Mercedez Benz Stadium at a total cost of $1.6 Billion after 25 years and is now being demolished. (2007 renovations to the Georgia Dome were $300 million for a stadium that would be torn down in less than a decade). 

So they threw a couple of Billion dollars at all this stadium merry-go-round construction in order to "make it work" for them. The difference is, Atlanta is willing to do that and keep the venues in use for other activities, but they still had several venues that were in use for less than 25 years and replaced or demolished. 

 

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spenser1058    834

SunTrust Park in particular has much to do with the racial politics of the Atlanta region and is separate and apart from Olympic planning. A great analysis of that boondoggle may be found here:

https://deadspin.com/the-braves-new-ballpark-is-an-urban-planners-nightmare-1797593063

As we can appreciate here locally, 20 years (really, 25 if you go back to Billy Payne's initial bid) can make a huge difference in politics for a fast-growing city.

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11 hours ago, dcluley98 said:

I agree with your general statement about it working better when planned with the city. The student housing for GT used to house athletes, Centennial Olympic Park, using/enhancing existing venues etc are great examples of this. 

Your statement on the stadiums is incorrect, however. Fulton County Stadium was used for the Olympics and they built Centennial Olympic Stadium for the main Track and Field venue.  This was planned to convert to Turner Field as the new home for the Braves after the games, and Fulton County Stadium was demolished afterwards. The Georgia Dome was already in existence, built in 1992 and home of the Falcons. It was also used during the Olympics for basketball and gymnastics. 

Turner Field was replaced by SunTrust Park for the Braves this year at a cost of $622 million after 20 years. The stadium was renovated once again to become Georgia State Stadium for college football, with Georgia State vacating the to be demolished Georgia Dome. The Georgia Dome was replaced by the upcoming Mercedez Benz Stadium at a total cost of $1.6 Billion after 25 years and is now being demolished. (2007 renovations to the Georgia Dome were $300 million for a stadium that would be torn down in less than a decade). 

So they threw a couple of Billion dollars at all this stadium merry-go-round construction in order to "make it work" for them. The difference is, Atlanta is willing to do that and keep the venues in use for other activities, but they still had several venues that were in use for less than 25 years and replaced or demolished. 

 

IMO , Atlanta has always been very forward thinking and it doesn't hurt that the city is VERY wealthy and it has the means to pull off big projects like these...

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HankStrong    360
21 hours ago, dcluley98 said:

I agree with your general statement about it working better when planned with the city. The student housing for GT used to house athletes, Centennial Olympic Park, using/enhancing existing venues etc are great examples of this. 

Your statement on the stadiums is incorrect, however. Fulton County Stadium was used for the Olympics and they built Centennial Olympic Stadium for the main Track and Field venue.  This was planned to convert to Turner Field as the new home for the Braves after the games, and Fulton County Stadium was demolished afterwards. The Georgia Dome was already in existence, built in 1992 and home of the Falcons. It was also used during the Olympics for basketball and gymnastics. 

Turner Field was replaced by SunTrust Park for the Braves this year at a cost of $622 million after 20 years. The stadium was renovated once again to become Georgia State Stadium for college football, with Georgia State vacating the to be demolished Georgia Dome. The Georgia Dome was replaced by the upcoming Mercedez Benz Stadium at a total cost of $1.6 Billion after 25 years and is now being demolished. (2007 renovations to the Georgia Dome were $300 million for a stadium that would be torn down in less than a decade). 

So they threw a couple of Billion dollars at all this stadium merry-go-round construction in order to "make it work" for them. The difference is, Atlanta is willing to do that and keep the venues in use for other activities, but they still had several venues that were in use for less than 25 years and replaced or demolished. 

 

I think a little of my phrasing was inaccurate, as I know some of those weren't direct replacements, but my comments are true in regards to venues that were due to be torn down were kept and used.  The housing was excellent, as you pointed out.

The Turner/SunTrust thing has little/nothing to do with the Olympics and more to do with the general problem with major league US sports.  I didn't even know about the racial element that Spence brought up.  This ransom mentality that pro sports owners use for new stadiums every 10-20 years is insanely out of control.

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dcluley98    531

No offense against you Hank, I agree with you mostly, just trying to get the stadium info correct. 

And I wish we had a few Billion Dollars to push toward public projects downtown. DPAC and the Citrus bowl renovation were great, but a couple billion more here or there would make a huge impact!

Think new iconic Orlando Museum of Art and central park connected to lake Eola and real public transit and connected green trail system for pedestrians and cyclists. . . and . . . and. . . :tw_grin:

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Demetree finally getting the ball rolling on redeveloping up to 48 acres across from UCF. When we were looking in 2015 at one of their spots they added redevelopment clause and we found another spot when that was added as this was clearly happening. Not sure who owns the dumpy old gas station lot but if that gets done too this will be huge for that area.

Demetree is planning to turn the stretch of strip shopping centers on Collegiate Way into a new retail, restaurant, and student housing complex. It would have about 50,000 square feet of new retail, in addition to the 90,000 square feet already there.

A student housing tower could add apartments and studios for up to 1,400 students, Heatherly said.

gs-demetree-global-land-redevelopment-ne

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