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alslex1

Where does Kentucky fit?

Do you consider Kentucky to be a Southern or Midwestern state?  

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  1. 1. Do you consider Kentucky to be a Southern or Midwestern state?

    • Southern
      83
    • Midwestern
      25


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Kentucky was a slave state, serves sweet tea, has a more Southern accent, and the University of Kentcky is in the Southeastern Conference. I think that speaks for itself.

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Kentucky was a slave state, serves sweet tea, has a more Southern accent, and the University of Kentcky is in the Southeastern Conference.  I think that speaks for itself.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Virginia and North Carolina were confederate states but are not in the S.E.C. so I'm not sure that can classify a state.

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Nonetheless, putting it in the SEC and not the Big 10 seems like the NCAA considers it to be the South. You could argue that NC and VA are Atlantic states, or even Eastern states. Semantics really when you boil down to it.

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This is a tough one. Louisville would seem to be Midwestern given its geographic location on the river, but I think in general the state could be considered Southern.

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I think Louisville has more in common with typical River cities than the Midwest, in general. Because of the large rivers, New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, etc. all seem to enjoy a common cultural bond, that's not experienced in the general South or Midwest.

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I'd call it Southern. However, arguments could be made that part of the state reflects the Midwestern culture (such as the Louisville area). This kind of thing happens often though; one state, two different cultures. Look at Florida, cities like Miami and Orlando are unique and do not fit the mold of "Southern cities." The same thing happens in Illinois. There is a world of difference between Chicago and Carbondale in the southern part of the state. It might be necessary to draw lines right through the center of some of these states when classifying them.

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I'd call it Southern.  However, arguments could be made that part of the state reflects the Midwestern culture (such as the Louisville area).  This kind of thing happens often though; one state, two different cultures.  Look at Florida, cities like Miami and Orlando are unique and do not fit the mold of "Southern cities."  The same thing happens in Illinois.  There is a world of difference between Chicago and Carbondale in the southern part of the state.  It might be necessary to draw lines right through the center of some of these states when classifying them.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Very True. Good points.

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It's defintely majority Southern if only for the fact that the Ohio River cuts it off from the rest of the Midwest (which many, including myself, see as a border between the North and South). Not to mention all of the points shown above. It may be a much less Southern-cultured state than say an Alabama or Mississippi, but it's still Southern.

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I think that in terms of the majority culture, it is more closely tied to the south. But the border areas like Louisville (Louisville is on the Ohio border, isn't it?) and the Kentucky half of Cincinatti fit better with the Midwest.

Also, Kentucky fits better with the south in terms of physiography. Much of the Midwest is very flat while Kentucky is very mountainous.

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Like most people here, I'd say outside NKY and Louisville, it is Southern. Not Deep South, but still Southern. NKY and Louisville are more like the Midwest in character though.

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I say that the line that seperates the north and it south is the TN & KY..

Tenn borders all the southern states and Ky borders all the northern. To make a long story short, I say that Tennessee begins the south..

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It's defintely majority Southern if only for the fact that the Ohio River cuts it off from the rest of the Midwest (which many, including myself, see as a border between the North and South).  Not to mention all of the points shown above.  It may be a much less Southern-cultured state than say an Alabama or Mississippi, but it's still Southern.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I completely concur. I have always found the Ohio River a true division line between the North and South. Outside of pockets of "midwesterness", primarily in Louisville and Covington, the vast majority of the state cleary comes across in culture, tradition, and attitudes as southern.

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Yeah, KY seems southern to me.

I've got inlaws in Owensboro KY who talk with the thickest southern accents, chow down on catfish, BBQ, raise hell in the Baptist church--the whole southern cultural thing.

In fact, the southern thing doesn't really end at the Ohio River for me. Most of southern Illinois, southern Indiana, etc., seems about as southern as Tennessee.

The only part of the state that bear some resemblance to the "north", might be the northeastern section which might be a little bit like Pennsylvania.

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Kentucky is a southern state in terms of culture, identity, and accent. I used to live in Louisville, Ky (now in live in Atlanta). When I lived there, I remember meeting people from the deep south, such as Alabama and Mississippi, who were in Louisville and thought they were in the "North" commenting on how strong their accents were compared to mine. I always said no, the North was about 50 miles further up I-65 mid-way between Louisville and Indy. To me, that is the delimiting line - not the Ohio river.

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Kentucky was a slave state, serves sweet tea, has a more Southern accent, and the University of Kentcky is in the Southeastern Conference.  I think that speaks for itself.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Just a little history lesson for ya - from a "Southern gentlemen" born and bred in Kentucky.

"Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin proposed that slave states like Kentucky should conform to the amendments of the United States constitution and remain in the Union. When Lincoln requested 75,000 men to serve in the Union, Magoffin, a Southern sympathizer, countered that Kentucky would "...furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister southern states."* A proclamation was issued forbidding either the United States or the Confederate government to undertake any movement of troops or occupy any post on Kentucky soil, and further warned citizens of the state against taking part in hostilities. Kentucky had declared itself a neutral state to both Lincoln and Jefferson Davis; however, if neutrality was broken, the state pledged to become part of the Confederacy.

Kentucky's neutrality was broken when Confederate General Leonidas Polk invaded Columbus, Kentucky in 1861. The Kentucky Legislature, in response, passed a resolution directing the governor to demand the evacuation of Confederate forces from Kentucky soil. Magoffin vetoed the proclamation, but the legislature voted against Magoffin and the resolution was passed. The legislature further decided to back General Ulysses S. Grant and his Union troops stationed in Paducah on the grounds that the Confederacy voided the original pledge by breaking Kentucky's neutral status first. December 10, 1861, Kentucky became the 13th state "admitted" to the Confederacy. Kentucky, along with Missouri, was a state with representatives in both Congresses and with regiments in both Federal and Confederate armies. Alsog as a side note - both Lincoln and Jefferson (the Presidents of the Union and Confederacy) were both born in Kentucky! ;)

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Yeah, KY seems southern to me.

I've got inlaws in Owensboro KY who talk with the thickest southern accents, chow down on catfish, BBQ, raise hell in the Baptist church--the whole southern cultural thing.

I am from Kentucky and consider myself southern. I do not like catfish or BBQ and I am Catholic... not southern Baptist. Not everyone in the south fits the stereotypes that are placed on us. By the way I have ALL my teeth and have a B.A. and M.A. from the Univeristy of Kentucky. :thumbsup:

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I would consider Kentucky appalachian, Like that of West Virginia, I wouldn't consider either of them southern, more of an entity, however humoursly stereotyped, of there own.

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I would say it's definitely Southern. I could tell by the accent, and friendliness of the folks there. I drove through Kentucky to Tennessee, and the cultures seemed to have a strong similarity. It was a very enjoyable experience, and I hope to visit again some time soon.

MrCoffee

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I say Southern. To me, the South really starts around Cincy in southern Ohio where the gorgeous rolling hills like those common in the Southeast begin. As far as attitudes and ways of life are concerned, I don't think there really are many vast differences between most of the American South and Midwest especially once we talk about less urban and rural areas. Accents are a different story. :)

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Kentucky is a little like my home state of Arkansas. Both have parts that are definately southern but also have parts that seem more midwestern. Arkansas is also on the west side of the Mississippi so it seems to get left out of the 'southeast'.

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It depends. Louisville is NOT southern. I would say the part between Lexington and Louisville are more midwestern, Lexington is southern. The east and southern part of the state are southern. You cant classify it as either.

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I live on the Indiana/Kentucky Border (Indiana side), just across the river from Louisville (I work in Louisville) - and while theres an argument to be made that Louisville has been formed with some midwestern influences, I think the majority of Kentuckians consider themselves Southern and would actually be insulted to be called "yankee" Midwesterners.

And I think the influence divide cuts both ways. You defiantly see plenty of rebel flags in Cincinatti which is on the "northern" side of the Ohio river. In the end I'd say theres the South which starts with Kentucky, and then eventually you get into the "deep south" starting with Alabama, Mississipi, etc. If the question were "is Kentucky in the Deep South, I say defiantly not" But I do believe its southern.

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